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GSAW2008

GSAW2008 Agenda
 
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March 31-April 3, 2008
Crowne Plaza Hotel
Redondo Beach, California


GSAW2
008 Agenda, Presentations, & Tutorials

Theme: "Achieving Operationally Responsive Ground Systems"

Monday March 31, 2008

Tutorials
 

A. Building Solid Ground System Architectures: Architecture Principles and UML Views
Instructor: Jeff Garland, CrystalClear Software, Inc.

B. Special Topics in Ground Systems for Satellite Operations
Instructors: James Anderson, Jim Shneer, Donald Town, Scott Turner, The Aerospace Corporation

C. Service-Oriented Architecture in the Context of Ground Systems
Instructors: Steven Fonseca, Dan Crichton, Jeff Estefan, Adans Ko, Costin Radulescu, Jeff Singer, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

D. Introduction to Net-Centricity

Instructors: Scott Boone, Ivan Filippenko, Judy Kerner, Craig Lee, Bob Lindell, Leo Marcus, Mary Nichols, Matthew Presley, Eltefaat Shokri, Brian Tung, The Aerospace Corporation

E. Systems Engineering and Architecture Frameworks for Operationally Responsive Ground Systems

Instructor: Rosalind Lewis, The Aerospace Corporation

F. Agile Development --> Agile Acquisition?

Instructor: Peter Hantos, The Aerospace Corporation

G. Use Case Literacy: Requirements Specification with Use Cases
Instructor: Hadar Ziv, University of California, Irvine

H. Software Testing for Mission-Critical Ground Systems
Instructor: Suellen Eslinger, The Aerospace Corporation


Tuesday April 1, 2008
Session 1: Keynote Session
 

Introduction and Announcements
Anil Agrawal, GSAW2008 General Chair, The Aerospace Corporation

Welcome Address
Rami Razouk, Senior Vice President, Engineering and Technology Group, The Aerospace Corporation

Keynote Address
Lt. Gen. Michael Hamel, Commander, Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center


Session 2: Responding to Dynamic Environments
Chair: Jonathan Becker, The Aerospace Corporation
 

Architecting a Transition to the Next Generation
Paul Ondrus, Vanessa Griffin, Les Shipley, NOAA Satellite Operations Facility

The Interim: Until You Achieve an Operationally Responsive Ground System
Bob Wendlandt, Kelly Clarke, Danny Kiewicz, Jordan Lei, Charles Miyamoto, Kyran Owen-Mankovich, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Interface Standards as an Enabler for Operational Responsive Space
Brian Davis, Space/Ground System Solutions, Inc.; Michael Hurley, Mark Johnson, Gurpartap Sandhoo, Naval Research Laboratory


Session 3: Development Strategies
Chair: Sam Cantrell, The Aerospace Corporation
 

Human Factors Engineering in System Design for Operationally Responsive Ground Systems
Laura Boltz, John Andrusyszyn, Lockheed Martin Information Systems and Global Services

Can You SPEL BPEL?

Brad Kizzort, Harris Corporation

E-40-07, a New Standard for Simulation Model Portability and its Implementation in SIMULUS

Nicola Di Nisio, Terma GmbH; Nuno Sebastião, European Space Agency/European Space Operations Centre


Session 4: Architecting Adaptable Ground Systems
Chair: Judy Kerner, The Aerospace Corporation
 

Operationally Responsive Facets of the NPOESS Ground System
Keith Reinke, Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems; Peter Phillips, The Aerospace Corporation; Joe Mulligan, NPOESS Integrated Program Office

COSMO-SkyMed Solutions for Ground Segment Expandability and Interoperability

Gianni Casonato, Fabio Covello, Giuseppe Francesco De Luca, Italian Space Agency; Graziano Marano, Italian Ministry of Defence

Turnkey Integrated Satellite Operations Solution for ProtoStar

Stuart Daughtridge, Integral Systems, Inc.; Steven Smith, ProtoStar Ltd.


Session 5: Designing for Flexibility and Robustness
Chair: Larry Bergman, Jet Propulsion Laboratory
 

Evolution of the Lunar Network
Jonathan Gal-Edd, Keiji Tasaki, Ron Miller, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Jim Schier, NASA Headquarters

Federated Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) for Effects-Based Operations (EBO)

Matt Brown, James Dormer, Raytheon

Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) Mission Control Segment (MCS) Software Maturity

Carlos Rexach, Asya Campbell, The Aerospace Corporation; David Thorpe, Scott Carey, Lockheed Martin Information Systems and Global Services


Session 6: Operational Perspectives
Chair: Anil Agrawal, The Aerospace Corporation
 

CCSDS – Developing Standards for Operations
Mike Kearney, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

Use of Python as a Satellite Operations and Testing Automation Language

Gonzalo Garcia, GMV Space Systems, Inc.

Architecture Evolution Program (AEP) Ground System Transition

Lt. Col. Janet Grondin, Jeff Vance, Maj. John Doucet, AEP and LADO Transition

Flight Software Ground System Impacts

Mark G. Walker


Wednesday April 2, 2008
Session 7: Keynote Session
Chair: Marilee Wheaton, The Aerospace Corporation
 

Introduction and Announcements
Anil Agrawal, GSAW2008 General Chair, The Aerospace Corporation

Keynote Address

Lt. Gen. Harry Raduege, Jr. (USAF, Ret.), Executive Council Chair Emeritus, Network Centric Operations Industry Consortium


Session 8: Net-Centric Approaches
Chair: Carl Sunshine, The Aerospace Corporation
 

Why Choose CCSDS SM&C for Your Next Ground Segment?
Mario Merri, European Space Agency/European Space Operations Centre

Maximizing Flexibility without Impacting Operational Responsiveness in SOA-Based Satellite Ground Systems

Richard Anthony, General Dynamics C4 Systems - National Systems Division

Using a Service-Oriented Approach in TSAT

Neal London, Lockheed Martin; Carl Sunshine, The Aerospace Corporation; Charles Hammons, Software Engineering Institute


Session 9: Testing for Success
Chair: Frank Fong, The Aerospace Corporation
 

Development of a Ground System Architecture Test Bed Array
Howard Gans, Lennis Bearden, Eric Hertzog, Royce Hall, Allan Dianic, Erik Cotton, Brad Kizzort, Harris Corporation

Scenario-Based Testing added to an Existing Program

Alice Shaw, Lockheed Martin Information Systems and Global Services

MPCS: Develop and Test As You Fly for MSL

Michael Tankenson, Lloyd DeForrest, Jet Propulsion Laboratory


Session 10: Working Groups
Chair: Sergio Alvarado, The Aerospace Corporation

Session 10A: Test Like You Fly Philosophy Applied to Ground Segment Testing
Chairs: Julie White, Marilyn Dubas, Trudy Bergen, The Aerospace Corporation

“Test Like You Fly” (TLYF) is a verification and validation approach that has its roots in naval and aviation vehicle testing (fly before you buy). The recommendation to apply this philosophy to space systems comes from space vehicle hardware-oriented specifications (MIL-HDBK-343, MIL-STD-1540). As such, what discussion there has been to date on this philosophy is heavily oriented to space vehicle component, unit, subsystem, payload, and the integrated space vehicle testing, especially with respect to space environments. Recent published works identify an end-to-end, days-in-the-life test involving both space vehicle and ground segment as the ultimate TLYF test. While additional discussion and publication has addressed applying the TLYF principle to the integrated space vehicle and lower levels of space segment hardware (and occasionally software), very little discussion has yet taken place about applying the TLYF philosophy to ground segment and lower-level ground element testing. This working group will discuss key aspects of Aerospace’s recently published TLYF assessment technique applied to space system ground segment testing.

‘Test Like You Fly’ at APL
Walter Mitnick, The Johns Hopskins University Applied Physics Laboratory


Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission Experience

Ben Jai, Robin O’Brien, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology


Session 10B: Ground Systems Standardization and Commonality: Continuing the Dialogue
Chair: Miriam Nadel, The Aerospace Corporation

There is general agreement that some standardization of spacecraft ground systems can reduce the cost of both development and operations. A working group discussion at last year’s GSAW identified areas of consensus regarding benefits, risks, and obstacles associated with standardization, commonality, and reuse within ground systems, as well as dissenting views about the best way to overcome these obstacles. This working group is intended to continue that dialogue, with an emphasis on lessons learned from real-world projects and innovative approaches to increasing standardization. The working group will be primarily discussion-oriented. There will be approximately five panelists with backgrounds in military, civil, and commercial space and with experience in both U.S. and international environments. Acquisition, oversight, and operational experience will be represented, as will the views of vendors of ground system solutions. Panelists will be provided a list of questions about their experiences and asked to provide a brief (10 -15 minute) introductory response to those questions. The remainder of the session will consist of discussion amongst the working group participants.

Ground Systems Standardization and Commonality: Continuing the Dialogue
Miriam H. Nadel, The Aerospace Corporation

Ground Systems Standardization and Commonality: Continuing the Dialogue TDRS & JWST
Jonathan Gal-Edd, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Ground Systems Standardization and Commonality
Mike Hogan, The Aerospace Corporation

Ground Systems Standardization and Commonality: Continuing the Dialogue
Mario Merri, European Space Agency

Ground Systems Standardization and Commonality: Continuing the Dialogue
Deane Sibol, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Session 10C: Architecture-Centric Evolution (ACE) Working Group 2008
Chairs: Sheri Benator, Sergio Alvarado, Phil Schmidt, The Aerospace Corporation

The Architecture-Centric Evolution (ACE) Working Group Session is the sixth of a GSAW series to promote the central role of software architectures during the acquisition and development of software-intensive systems. The ACE Session provides a forum for software-intensive system experts, users, developers, and researchers to collaborate and elucidate high-level recommendations for improving the representation, development, and analysis of software architectures. This year’s topic will be: Successes and Challenges in Architecting Operationally Responsive Ground Systems. The working group will focus on techniques and tools to better develop and evaluate software architectures so that they lead to more responsive ground systems that better adapt to new capabilities and missions.

Architecture Development for Responsive Operational Systems

William Macaulay, The Aerospace Corporation

Architecture Centric Evolution

Jeff Garland. CrystalClear Software, Inc.

Technology Convergence & Its Adaptability to New Capability

George Auyeung, Bob Epps, Lockheed Martin Corporation

The Importance of Architecture Governance for Achieving Operationally Responsive Ground Systems

Jeff Estefan, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Defense Acquisition Performance Assessment – The Recommendation for Time Certain Development: Architectural Considerations

Peter Hantos, The Aerospace Corporation

Software Engineering Institute Acquisition Support Program Architecture Product Update

Peter Capell, Software Engineering Institute

Applying Frictionless Development To Adapt to New Program Capabilities

Paula Obeid, Robert Mumme, Embeddedplus Engineering;
Michael Mott and Ben Amaba, Industrial Business Machines

From Requirements to Architectures

Hadar Ziv, University of California, Irvine

Session 10D: Multimission Ground Systems: Approaches and Challenges
Chairs: Duane Bindschadler, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Dan Smith, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Ground systems continue to feel pressures to reduce the costs of developing flight projects and of spaceflight operations without sacrificing quality or driving up risk. One obvious (but not necessarily straightforward) solution is to adopt a multimission approach to ground systems. In this session we examine and discuss some of the basic architectural principles of multimission ground systems, some of the architectural choices to be made, and some of the challenges to creating and maintaining multimission systems. The session is in three parts, one focused on the overall MultiMission Operations System (MMOS), one on the Ground Data System (hardware, software, networks) part of the MMOS, and one focused on issues of managing a MMOS. The first two parts consist of a few short presentations and general discussion. The last part is a panel discussion with questions and comments from the working group attendees.

Session 10E: Refining a Reference Model for Network-Centric Ground Systems and Drilling Down into Emerging Standards and Implementation Tools
Chairs: Craig Lee, Mary Nichols, The Aerospace Corporation

Service-oriented architectures based on Web and grid service standards are key supporting technologies for network-centric operations. This working group session will build on previous GSAW working groups and also present work being done as part of an Aerospace corporate strategic initiative, the Network-Centric Operations Industry Consortium, the Open Geospatial Consortium, and the European Space Agency. These discussions will refine previous versions of a reference model for network-centric satellite ground systems, review current prototyping efforts and implementation tools.

At GSAW 2007, a notional reference model for network-centric satellite ground systems was presented. This model has been refined with feedback and comments from the satellite community. This model was also used to drive a review of the Defense Information Standards Registry (DISR) that will be revisited in 2008 to re-evaluate the availability, maturity, and gaps of necessary standards.

In addition to doing a standards review, we will present talks by program office representatives on business cases for SOA adoption. The adoption of any new technology carries both risks and opportunities. Building a business case involves the evaluation of both risks and opportunities, their magnitude, where they might occur, and whether a significant net benefit is expected.

Session 10F: Challenges in Developing and Acquiring Systems with Evolving Requirements
Chairs: Nancy Kern, Mary Jo Gura, The Aerospace Corporation

Many of our spacecraft ground systems are acquired as a “Voyage of Discovery.” They start off with requirements which are often incomplete and unstable. Furthermore, the program management processes and interfaces are not necessarily adequate to assure mission success. The challenge of developing a new system that is operationally responsive under these circumstances is enormous. Similarly, adapting existing ground systems to meet new requirements is a difficult task.

In this working group, acquisition experts with insights into developing and acquiring flexible systems will present their personal experience and recommendations for success. Perspectives of both contractor and government teams on best practices and lessons learned will be provided. In addition, results of recent studies will address evolutionary acquisition; COTS management; cost and schedule impacts of program volatility; and failure scenarios. A question-and-answer session will follow each presentation. At the conclusion of the workshop, the speakers will form a panel to further discuss the most critical issues and solutions with the audience.


Challenges in Developing and Acquiring Systems with Evolving Requirements Introduction
Nancy Kern, Mary Jo Gura, The Aerospace Corporation


Acquiring Software-Intensive Ground Systems with Evolving Requirements
Suellen Eslinger, The Aerospace Corporation


Identifying Acquisition Patterns of Failure Using Systems Archetypes
Brian Gallagher, Software Engineering Institute


How Raytheon Meets the Challenge of Developing Systems with Evolving Requirements
Linda Martz, Raytheon IIS Rocky Mountain


Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) Program Mission Control Segment (MCS
Asya Campbell, The Aerospace Corporation;
Scott Carey, Lockheed Martin


Session 11: Evening Session (Parallel Presentations)
Chair: David Bart, The Aerospace Corporation


Session 11A: Open Discussion with NASA Exploration Interoperability Team
Steve Rader, NASA Johnson Space Center; Dan Smith, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in human systems integration. As a result of the United States Air Force (USAF) Scientific Advisory Board in 2004, updates to the National Security Space (NSS) Acquisition Policy, and a recent SMC policy letter on human systems integration, there is an interest in—and need for—development of tools and techniques that can be used in the development of operational systems that support the skill, knowledge, and abilities of operators, maintainers and users. Integration of users across the system lifecycle represents 40–60% of lifecycle costs. Space systems acquisitions have inherent human systems integration challenges: increasing information demands on operators, requirements for operators to perform jobs in new/different ways, continuing pressure to reduce manpower, and a desire to limit the exposure of personnel to threats. This workshop will address how and where HSI can help in space systems development, and will include a mix of presentations and panel discussions.

Session 11B: Special GSAW-SPIN Event
TOPIC: Next-Generation Processes for Achieving Operationally Responsive Ground Systems

This is a special evening joint-session between GSAW and the Southern California Software Process Improvement Network (SPIN). It allows our friends who cannot usually come to daytime meetings to attend.

SPEAKER: Barry Boehm, Director, Center for Systems and Software Engineering, University of Southern California

A major challenge for achieving operationally responsive ground systems is the slowness of current processes for adapting complex software-intensive systems to increasingly rapid change. A recent analysis of change processing times for two complex, high-assurance software-intensive systems, one of which included a ground station, showed average times of 27 workdays for within-group changes, 48 workdays for cross-group changes, and 141 workdays for changes involving contract modifications.

This talk will present a next-generation synthesis of the spiral model and other leading process models into the Incremental Commitment Model (ICM) being piloted or considered for adoption in some parts of DoD. The ICM emphasizes architecting systems to encapsulate subsystems undergoing the most rapid change and having them implemented by agile developers; and architecting the incremental development process by having agile systems engineers handling longer-range change traffic to rebaseline the plans for future increments while largely plan-driven teams develop and continuously V&V the current increment. Further information on the ICM in the context of integrating systems and software engineering can be found at http://csse.usc.edu/events/2008/ARR/pages/material.html.

Session 11C: Case Study
Operationally Responsive Satellite System CuSat - Nanosat with an Attitude
Greg Shreve, Andrew Kwas, Northrop Grumman Corporation; Albert Ren, Cornell University



Thursday April 3, 2008
Session 12: Keynote Session
 

Introduction and Announcements
Anil Agrawal, GSAW2008 General Chair, The Aerospace Corporation

Keynote Address (Rover movie clip)
Charles Elachi, Director, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory



Session 13: Panel Discussion: Achieving Operationally Responsive Ground Systems
Chair: Frank Fong, The Aerospace Corporation

Moderator
Willie Krenz, General Manager, Computers and Software Division, The Aerospace Corporation

Panelists
Rick Donnelly,
General Manager, Ground Programs Division, The Aerospace Corporation

Robert McCoy,
Technical Director, Operationally Responsive Space (ORS) Office, Kirtland AFB

Mario Merri,
Head of Application Mission Data Systems, European Space Agency

Steve Rader,
C3I Chief Architect, Constellation Program Office, NASA Johnson Space Center

James Wertz, President, Microcosm Inc.


Session 14: Summary Session
Working Group Outbriefs

 

Session 10A: Test Like You Fly Philosophy Applied to Ground Segment Testing
Julie White, Marilyn Dubas, Trudy Bergen, The Aerospace Corporation

Session 10B: Ground Systems Standardization and Commonality: Continuing the Dialogue
Miriam Nadel, The Aerospace Corporation

Session 10C: Architecture-Centric Evolution (ACE) Working Group 2008
Sheri Benator, Sergio Alvarado, Phil Schmidt, The Aerospace Corporation

Session 10D: Multimission Ground Systems: Approaches and Challenges
Duane Bindschadler, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Dan Smith, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Session 10E: Refining a Reference Model for Network-Centric Ground Systems and Drilling Down into Emerging Standards and Implementation Tools
Craig Lee, Mary Nichols, The Aerospace Corporation

Session 10F: Challenges in Developing and Acquiring Systems with Evolving Requirements
Nancy Kern, Mary Jo Gura, The Aerospace Corporation


Workshop Summary

Tim Travis, The Aerospace Corporation

Closing Remarks

Anil Agrawal, GSAW2008 General Chair, The Aerospace Corporation

End of General Workshop


Classified Session
Held at The Aerospace Corporation

Session C15: Keynote Session
Chair: Jonathan Becker, Classified Workshop Chair, The Aerospace Corporation
 

Welcome Address
Mal De Ponte, Senior Vice President, National Systems Group, The Aerospace Corporation

Keynote Address

Pete Rustan, Director, Ground Enterprise Directorate, National Reconnaissance Office


Session C16: Plenary Session

Chair: Julie Street, The Aerospace Corporation
 

Presentations

Session C17:Plenary Session
Chair: Rick Johnson, The Aerospace Corporation
 

Presentations

Closing Remarks

Networking Hour


End of GSAW2008
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